How to Make Bokashi

How to Make Bokashi

Bokashi composting is an anaerobic process that relies on inoculated bran to ferment kitchen waste, including meat and dairy, into a safe soil builder and nutrient-rich tea for your plants. This article will explain how you can make your own bokashi without the help of expensive kits.

How to Make Bokashi´╗┐

Bokashi composting is an anaerobic process that relies on inoculated bran to ferment kitchen waste, including meat and dairy, into a safe soil builder and nutrient-rich tea for your plants. This article will explain how you can make your own bokashi without the help of expensive kits.

Ingredients in Proportions:
– 20 bags of soil (clay-like soil is better, retains nutrients)
– 20 bags of cut straw (or maize stalks)
– 20 bags of manure (better dry; any kind, diversity always trumps)
– 1 bag of charcoal
– 1 bag of wheat bran (or maize chaff)
– 5-10 litres of molasses (the thicker the better)
– 1 kilo of yeast (better dry)
– 25-50 kilos of rock dust (Any kind, diversity always trumps. The finer the better)
– Water

Notes:
The smaller (finer) the components in the ingredients are, the faster the digestion will occur. Size of the ingredients should be proportionate to have a relatively homogenous decomposition. Add water until the humidity content of the Bokashi is around 35-45% humidity. Keep into account the humidity of each ingredient. If saturated, the process will happen anaerobically and develop undesired features. Hand test: take some Bokashi and make a fist, if the matter stays together without being saturated the water content is fine. Never add water after the first day.

  • The utility of ingredients: (in case of unavailability, can be replaced with other components of
    same utility)
  • Molasses: Sugar that constitutes the energy for the microorganisms, could be replaced with normal sugar. Molasses is a corrosive substance; therefore, it contains whatever it breaks down.
  • Yeast: Sets a party atmosphere: the temperature, availability of food, etc. Invites microbes from outside. When yeast decomposes it becomes protein and nitrogen which are great for
    the soil.
  • Soil: brings microbiology and homogeneity to the mix.
  • Manure: Bring microbes (5 functional groups: fungi, bacteria, yeast, etc.) and nitrogen.
  • Charcoal (wood): Retains humidity and nutrients, improves soil structure, root development and oxygen availability, home for microorganisms, is a thermic regulator, a pH buffer and when it decomposes, it forms humus.

Process: Aerobic
1) Find a covered space, it is better if the ground is soil so the excess humidity can escape through the soil.
2) Spread the ingredients in multiple layers over one another forming a type of lasagna. The more layers you make, the easier the mixing will be later on. The heap should not be taller than 1
metre (the extra pressure would cause anaerobic conditions)
3) The layers should then be shovelled enough for the whole to be a homogenous mix.
4) The heap will start heating up. Once it reaches 40+ degrees Celsius it should be mixed again and from then on it should be mixed twice a day for three days. The heat should never exceed 54
degrees Celsius. After three days, mixing once a day should be sufficient.
5) Do this for 15 days (a bit longer during humid seasons). At the end of the process, the heap should be neither humid or hot.